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Blog : Whistleblower Retaliation

5 Famous Whistleblower Cases in U.S. History

Famous Federal Whistleblower CasesEmployees in the public and private sector alike are under numerous obligations to keep the confidences of their employers. But the history of the last half-century is filled with federal whistleblowers who felt the public had a right to know their employers’ best-kept – and illegal – secrets.

Here are five of the most famous federal whistleblower cases in U.S. history to help you understand your own whistleblower rights.

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Workplace Retaliation in California: Common Questions, Answered

Workplace Retaliation in California Common Questions and AnswersWhile most Californians know that both federal and state laws exist to protect employees from workplace discrimination and harassment, many still have specific questions about California employment laws – especially when they involve workplace retaliation and the adverse employment actions which characterize retaliation.

This article will answer common questions about workplace retaliation laws in California to help you better understand your employee rights.

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What California Employees Should Know About Whistleblower Retaliation

If you’ve reported illegal conduct in the workplace and have been retaliated against by your employer for doing so, you could be a good candidate for filing a whistleblower complaint in the state of California. Just as there are state and federal workplace retaliation laws in place to protect you from your employer illegally retaliating against you for other reasons, what you might not know is that special whistleblower retaliation laws can also protect you from specific negative employment actions unfairly enforced in the workplace.

Here, we break down what employees need to know about whistleblower retaliation, and how our expert employment lawyers at Hennig Ruiz can help protect your employee rights today.

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